How Hard Should You Train?

Cycle Greater Yellowstone is designed to be suitable for a fairly broad range of riders. There’s not a suffer-fest climb every day, but there’s plenty of opportunity to test yourself between longer distances and elevation.  But no matter which way you go, this is a ride you need to train seriously for. 

It’s Not Just the Miles

One factor that surprises many riders on week-long tours: seat time. It’s not just what shape your legs, lungs and heart are in; it’s also your derriere. Make sure you’ve trained for consecutive days – as many in a row as possible – at least several times before this event. It will make your riding so much more pleasant.  And chamios cream.  There are a lot of different creams out there, and we don't recommend any certain brand.  What we do recommend is you use it, especially if this is your first high mileage bike tour.  If you don't know what we're talking about, Google it:  Chamois cream use for cyclists. 

 

 

Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem high

Altitude: We begin at 5,000 feet, Dubois sits at 7,000 feet and Togwotee Pass tops out at 9,660 feet.  You will not drop much below 4,000 feet, so if you're not used to elevation, you'll surely feel it constantly nagging at you.  While we know many of you can’t train at altitude, your best protection against the elevation sickness is to come to the ride in the best shape possible, stay hydrated and listen to warning signs while riding.  It’s virtually impossible to limit the effects of altitude, but there’ll be a whole lot less gasping for air if you be sure to train for the mileage.  Many of our participants have found it helpful to come to the area 1-2 days in advance to acclimate.  

Hydration at altitude is very important.  This is considered a high desert area.  Humidity is can easily be below 10%, and your sweat dries so quick you won't know you're losing water.  Always drink - before, during and after.  Keep a water bottle at night and come equipped with two water bottle holders. 

The Other Kind of Fit

Fitness is critical, of course – but that other type of fit is equally important: make sure you’re fitted to your bike. If you haven’t had a professional bike fitting, you might be amazed at what a difference a few adjustments can make over 400-plus miles in a week.