Usually bikes avoid glass...at CGY we take it on...in Glassisum style.

Katie Sisum is a modern glass artist, she pushes the boundaries of traditional thought by allowing people to view the medium beyond classical glasswork. She turns glass into colorful movement inspiring pieces. Using traditional techniques combined with hand made patterns and original art glass she creates stained glass panels and hand-blown glassware that invite the viewer to recall there favorite pastimes and memories. The piece may simply invite them to use there fingertips and explore glass as they have never done before. Katie’s goal is to inspire people to interact with glass in a less hard point of view and more with a smile of wonderment and wondering fingers.

Katie Sisum working in her studio.

Katie Sisum working in her studio.

Katie’s 2019 auction piece for Cycle Greater Yellowstone is a three layered standing sculptural window. Featuring the Greater Yellowstone Coalition grizzly and mountains that you will all be climbing and spending time in for the week. This window will look great back lit on a window sill or front lit on a bookcase. This is a one of a kind piece and the first layered sculpture bicycle window I’ve created in my 7 years of creating bicycle inspired glass work. Bid generously as all proceeds will go to Greater Yellowstone Coalition. Thank you Katie!

2019 Glassisum Designs art available for bidding during Cycle Greater Yellowstone.

2019 Glassisum Designs art available for bidding during Cycle Greater Yellowstone.

Meet Drew, He's a Winner

Meet Drew. 2019 will be Drew’s 5th time riding Cycle Greater Yellowstone and in 2017 he won the Roswell Bike Raffle. He’s bought tickets to nearly every bike raffle, not because he thought he’d win, but because ‘it’s a great way to support a cause and I believe in the work of Greater Yellowstone Coalition does, and I wouldn’t mind winning.’

Todd Kaib of Roswell Bicycles supports the ride each year.

Todd Kaib of Roswell Bicycles supports the ride each year.

Drew lives in West Yellowstone, a town Cycle has visited in the past. While he spends most his time riding roads, he throws a little mountain biking in there and is looking to getting into gravel riding as road traffic outside the park increases. Drew wanted a bike made for speed, so he worked with Todd to get set up on the Giant Defy Pro road bike. Since winning the bike, Drew and Todd have maintained a personal and professional relationship.

Riders from CGY 2017. Drew’s hometown of West Yellowstone hosted the start and finish.

Riders from CGY 2017. Drew’s hometown of West Yellowstone hosted the start and finish.

In 2015, Drew was part of the epic snowstorm that caught riders going over the Beartooth Highway. The legacy of this ride is told over beers each year at Cycle, but does it scare him off for the ride this summer? Not one bit. Drew recently spent time riding in Chamonix and the Dolomites, so he is ready to take on the pass -and out-pedal snow if need be! Purchase your chance to win!

Crew member supporting bikes from those who did not make it over the Beartooth Pass in 2015.

Crew member supporting bikes from those who did not make it over the Beartooth Pass in 2015.

Drew Barney, He’s a Winner!

Drew Barney, He’s a Winner!


2018 Cycle Greater Yellowstone: The Road Biking Trip of a Lifetime in Greater Yellowstone

Have you been looking for a new place to ride, one where the land is still as wild as it gets and you can almost imagine that dinosaurs are still meandering around? Cycle Greater Yellowstone has you covered, and even if you’ve done the CGY bike tour in past years, the 2018 route is almost completely new and not to be missed.

The ride will take place Sunday through Friday, August 11-17, 2018, with a bonus ride on Saturday morning in Sinks Canyon. It will cover parts of Wyoming that have never before been a part of the route: Cody, Meeteetse, Thermopolis, Pavillion, Dubois, and Lander. Started in 2013, Cycle Greater Yellowstone (also known as "The First Great Ride in the Last Best Place") exists to help grow awareness for the Greater Yellowstone Coalition. Over the years, the event has brought thousands of riders to areas in and around Yellowstone to appreciate the beauty and realize the importance of preserving our country’s lands. Along the way, camping and daily excursions are provided through nonprofit organizations in the area, so the ride has been able to take part in a community grant program that has given back about $175,000 to the various nonprofits on the route over the years. We call that a win-win-win for the local organizations, the riders, and the Greater Yellowstone Coalition.

The tour sells out almost every year, and if you’ve been craving the companionship of some new riding friends, Coordinator Jennifer Drinkwalter guarantees that the men and women you’ll meet on the ride will become lifetime friends. She’s seen, in past years, people who meet for the first time on day one of the ride and come back the next year as best friends and partners in the adventure.

If you’re looking for a tour that will challenge your riding endurance, but without leaving you totally wiped at the end of the day, this ride might be for you. Not only will you be getting in some serious base miles and having a blast, you’ll be ‘responsibly recreating’ around Yellowstone, which is the main goal of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition. Their mission statement reads that members are "people protecting the lands, waters, and wildlife of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, now and for future generations." Just taking the time to ride in the area and combine that recreation with conservation is exactly what the coalition hopes for.

Most days, you’ll be pedaling for a few hours—with the exception of one rest day, where you can still pedal Togwotee Pass—but there’s still plenty of time to explore the small towns that are dotted along the route.

DAY 1: CODY TO MEETEETSE

The first day is just a warm-up, though if the 40 miles you’ll do as a group at the start of a ride isn’t enough, you can always add on 35 extra miles riding next to the Greybull River into the Shoshone National Forest. The tiny town of Meeteetse has less than 400 residents, and your chance of seeing wildlife—like elk, grizzly bears, and the black-footed ferret—is high. (If you opt to add mileage, there are a few mining ghost towns in the area immediately surrounding the town.)

DAY 2: MEETEETSE TO THERMOPOLIS

Your second day of riding will fall around 70 miles through Wyoming, and ending in Thermopolis is a serious bonus. Nestled in Hot Springs County, you’ll be able to soak tired muscles in soothing hot springs. The town is called the Gateway to Yellowstone and boasts the world's largest mineral hot springs. Another bonus? Fifteen miles outside of town in Kirby is the Wyoming Whiskey Distillery.

DAY 3: THERMOPOLIS TO PAVILLION

Day 3 includes plenty of views down into Wind River Canyon. Cycle Greater Yellowstone

Day 3 includes plenty of views down into Wind River Canyon. Cycle Greater Yellowstone

The third day will have you pedaling about 68 miles from Thermopolis (take one last morning hot spring soak if you can!) to Pavillion. You’ll ride through Wind River Canyon to get to Pavillion, where you’ll be enjoying a great night of camping in Pavillion. The river is gorgeous, and you’ll wind through a canyon looking down at the water for much of the ride.

DAY 4: PAVILLION TO DUBOIS

Day 4 brings riders past Crowheart Butte on the way to Dubois Cycle Greater Yellowstone

Day 4 brings riders past Crowheart Butte on the way to Dubois Cycle Greater Yellowstone

With 66 miles of riding plus an option for more, you’ll be feeling ready for the rest day when you pull into Dubois. The town of Dubois is on US Route 26 and is the beginning of the Wyoming Centennial Scenic Byway. It’s also called one of the last ‘Old West’ towns, with a population well under 1,000. Despite the small town vibe, there are a dozen restaurants ranging from Mexican to an old-fashioned American diner to homemade donuts to brick oven pizza to choose from, plus two bars in town to dance the night away.

DAY 5: DUBOIS LAYOVER DAY

Resting in Dubois is a challenge with all the trails and historical sites in and around town OR THE ICONIC TOGWOTEE PASS RIDE. Cycle Greater Yellowstone

Resting in Dubois is a challenge with all the trails and historical sites in and around town OR THE ICONIC TOGWOTEE PASS RIDE. Cycle Greater Yellowstone

OK, ‘rest day’ might not be quite accurate, simply because there are too many things to see on foot or by bike. If you’re still feeling spry, there’s an out-and-back ride through Togwotee Pass, where you cross the Continental Divide. But if you want a day off the bike, there will be hikes in the area. Really need a rest day? Some folks will head to the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center and then hit the historical bars, following the tracks of Butch Cassidy, trappers, and traders.

DAY 6: DUBOIS TO LANDER

Sinks Canyon, at the southern end of the Wind River Mountains, is a must-see ride - offered on the saturday morning after the ride from dubois to lander. Cycle Greater Yellowstone

Sinks Canyon, at the southern end of the Wind River Mountains, is a must-see ride - offered on the saturday morning after the ride from dubois to lander. Cycle Greater Yellowstone

Your final day of pedaling is a big one of about 75 miles, plus the option to explore Sinks Canyon the next day—a can’t-miss stop filled with beautiful creeks, rivers, and bridges at the base of the southern Wind River Mountains. The hip mountain town of Lander itself is an excellent end point as well. Mountain biker Nancy Miller says despite the town’s major tourist attractions, great restaurants, and amazing breweries, it still has a mountain town vibe and hasn’t started boosting prices to gouge tourists. So your well-deserved pint of beer won’t break the bank.

HOW TO GET IN

Registration is now open for 2018, but it does sell out fast, so make sure you're checking the website regularly for updates. The price tag in 2017 covered all of your meals on the route and in camp, warm showers, camping space, route and gear support, baggage haul from camp to camp, and basic mechanic support, so expect 2018 to be similarly organized.

Originally written by RootsRated for Cycle Greater Yellowstone.

Getting Into the Nitty Gritty

Has it been a year already?  Well almost!  The 2016 Cycle Greater Yellowstone ride was full of big blue skies,  majestic mountain ranges,  rivers for days, roads that stretched towards the horizon and some of the friendliest people in Montana. Good times.

We've been preparing all year, but now we're getting into the nitty gritty:  lead crew members took to the road to look at sites after winter released it's cold grip.

First Stop:  West Yellowstone.  

Rob, CGY Site Coordinator  and Troy, sherpa and recycling leader working for the campground layout in West Yellowstone

Rob, CGY Site Coordinator  and Troy, sherpa and recycling leader working for the campground layout in West Yellowstone

CGY crew members working with a  local manager - rest stop preparation

CGY crew members working with a  local manager - rest stop preparation

Group discussion - parking? tents? showers?

Group discussion - parking? tents? showers?

Lower Mesa falls - day 1 rest stop

Lower Mesa falls - day 1 rest stop

Mary was working with warm river site manager - where do we put the port-a-potties?? 

Mary was working with warm river site manager - where do we put the port-a-potties?? 

Working the campsite  in Warm River, Idaho

Working the campsite  in Warm River, Idaho

Medic team lead, Christi, preparing with EMS in Driggs, Idaho

Medic team lead, Christi, preparing with EMS in Driggs, Idaho

Working with local Community Liaison, Corey McGrath in Driggs, idaho

Working with local Community Liaison, Corey McGrath in Driggs, idaho

Roads Prep - where the support vehicles drive......your gear, food, showers, and yes....always a port-a-potty

Roads Prep - where the support vehicles drive......your gear, food, showers, and yes....always a port-a-potty

Open season!

Open season!

Crew member troy  looking for  the perfect sherpa tent space

Crew member troy  looking for  the perfect sherpa tent space

Site Coordinator Rob walking on the Red road

Site Coordinator Rob walking on the Red road

Sand Dunes  on Red Road, Idaho - we've never brought our riders to the dunes before!

Sand Dunes  on Red Road, Idaho - we've never brought our riders to the dunes before!

Local land owner, dale,  in Kilgore, Idaho - centennials make a nice back drop don't they?

Local land owner, dale,  in Kilgore, Idaho - centennials make a nice back drop don't they?

On the road - always with a bike in tow

On the road - always with a bike in tow

we are tent professionals, promise.

we are tent professionals, promise.

Smile -- this will be fun!

Smile -- this will be fun!

We are looking forward to riding with you in August and showing you more of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem from the bike saddle.  Until then, ride safely and we'll keep getting ready for CGY 2017.  See you soon!

Photos By Jiayu Su